Electron Dance

Electron Dance Highlights

26Mar/192

Podcast: The Floor is Lava


Ivan Brett is the author of The Floor is Lava, a book which contains 99 games to play with family and friends. They're organised in chapters for different situations and moods like when you're stuck in a traffic jam, something to play after dinner or perhaps you're just looking for a straight-up party game. From Cat Eats Mouse, to Shut Your Eyes and Adjectival Animals - there's a lot of great stuff in here.

Ivan also hosts The Floor is Lava podcast that acts as a companion to the book. In each episode, he invites a guest on to play a bunch of games. And there are definitely no videogames to be found. Ivan and his guest can be duelling with words, spinning mad fiction or simply debating the finer points of the world's top five milks. Each game really only has one rule: that it must be fun.

I had been feeling it had been awhile since I had engaged with the more broader definition of games. No colourful graphics. No whoosing and beeping. No controllers. No fancy tech at all. When Ivan announced he was looking for podcast guests I put my hand up without hesitation.

So this week I am the guest on The Floor is Lava and on a scale of one to fun it was fun! You can get the podcast through Stitcher, iTunes or Spotify. Alternatively, you can listen via the embedded Stitcher player below.

Check out Ivan Brett's website and you can follow him on Twitter here.

10Jul/180

Figure It Out

A Good Snowman Is Hard To Build

A few weeks ago I published The Developers Who Won’t Hold Your Hand which discussed design considerations around a growing subgenre of games that leave the player to figure out the mechanics. I made use of droqen’s term “discoverable systems” because, frankly, we didn’t have one.

This was based on a number of interviews comprising over 5,000 words in total. That meant I had to cut a lot of words, even interesting stuff.

But recycling is good for us, so I’m presenting some of these lost words in a separate post.

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5Apr/16Off

Where Are They Now 2016: Part Four

watn-2016-lumiere

I thought it would be fun to go back and take another look at those developers I covered in the early days of Electron Dance. In six years, what has happened to them?

In the final part: Alex Ocias, Terry Cavanagh, Dan Marshall, Charlie Knight and Ed Key.

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9Mar/16Off

Where Are They Now 2016: Part Three

where-are-they-now-2016-3

I thought it would be fun to go back and take another look at those developers I covered in the early days of Electron Dance. In six years, what has happened to them?

In part three: Orihaus, Austin Breed, Chris Park, Jonas Kyratzes and Paul Eres.

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17Feb/16Off

Where Are They Now 2016: Part Two

where-are-they-now-2016-2

I thought it would be fun to go back and take another look at those developers I covered in the early days of Electron Dance. In six years, what has happened to them?

In part two: Puppygames, Douglas Wilson and Michael Brough.

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11Feb/16Off

Where Are They Now 2016: Part One

where-are-they-now-2016-1

I thought it would be fun to go back and take another look at those developers I covered in the early days of Electron Dance. In six years, what has happened to them?

In part one, I talk to Matt Verran, George Buckenham, Nicolau Chaud, Jay Kyburz and Gregory Avery-Weir.

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29Oct/15Off

Talos, 3: Where The Words End, The World Ends

This is the final part of a three-part essay on The Talos Principle which includes commentary from writers Jonas Kyratzes and Tom Jubert. The first part and second parts were posted earlier this week.

Talos-P3-World3-2015-09-06_00006

“There was nothing here when I first arrived. Did you know that?”

After completing The Talos Principle, I immediately bought The Road to Gehenna. Whereas I played Talos over nine months, I was more aggressive in working through Gehenna, tearing through it in a matter of weeks... although I fear the word “tear” has overstated my skills. It would be more accurate to write I “oozed through it like syrup”.

Gehenna is incredible. It’s so good that I now tend to think of Talos as a prequel to Gehenna.

Spoilers for The Talos Principle and The Road to Gehenna follow.

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28Oct/15Off

Talos, 2: I Am The Words

This is the second part of a three-part essay on The Talos Principle which includes commentary from writers Jonas Kyratzes and Tom Jubert. The first part was posted yesterday.

Talos-P2-QR-2014-12-12 01-43-36-50

“I see now that none of us are yet ready. The cycle exists so that we may improve ourselves. But the one who reaches the summit is not our superior, for they stand on our shoulders to reach it.”

-- The Shepherd v82.6.0174

When I first saw the QR texts, I sighed. Jesus, not another game with it’s-not-exposition-honest-guv graffiti on the wall! I initially paid little attention to them, reading them out of a completist need to do everything. But gradually I realised the walls held stories.

Spoilers for The Talos Principle follow.

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27Oct/15Off

Talos, 1: The Words Made The World

This is the first part of a three-part essay on The Talos Principle which includes commentary from writers Jonas Kyratzes and Tom Jubert.

Talos Beams

“In the beginning were the Words, and the Words made the world. I am the Words. The Words are everything. Where the Words end the world ends. You cannot go forward in an absence of space. Repeat.”

The most glorious moment in The Talos Principle (Croteam, 2014) is one that comes again and again. The moment occurs when a “sigil” is liberated from a devious puzzle, but the sigil itself is an empty token of advancement, the kind of dull trinket that games thrive on. No. The sigil has no power.

Turn around. Don’t speed on to the next challenge, just stop. Turn around and survey the glorious red and blue stitchwork you've sewn across the puzzle. Look at this ingenious thing you have made and be proud.

Spoilers for The Infinite Ocean and The Talos Principle follow.

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19May/15Off

Side by Side: Bloop

Side by Side is a video series on local multiplayer games. This is episode 17 of 17.

In the final episode of the first series, Joel Goodwin of Electron Dance and Gregg Burnell of Tap-Repeatedly twist their fingers around Rusty Moyher's Bloop. A game so simple it makes you wonder why no one did it before.

Watch the video here or direct on YouTube.

  • "It has a lot more depth and play to it than we thought."
  • "Now there's not much to this, but it's remarkable how enjoyable that was."
  • Bloop is available on iOS, Android and Kindle.
  • Side by Side hasn't done stunningly well, but we're not about to throw in the towel yet. We're planning on a second series which will start later this year.
  • If you enjoyed the series, please like our videos and subscribe to our channel.

The series theme is the delightful "Adventures in your sleep" by The Blake Robinson Synthetic Orchestra.